According to the National Safety Council, your odds of dying in a car accident are one in 107. But this number represents the odds without regard to location or age. This statistic merely means that when you die, you have a 1 in 107 chance that a car accident caused your death.

Oklahoma has a reputation for its high rate of fatal car crashes. This means that the odds of dying in a car crash in Oklahoma City are significantly higher than they may be in other places.

Today, we’ll cover information about the odds of dying in a car crash in Oklahoma City and the factors that influence those odds.

Fatal Car Accidents in Oklahoma

In 2019, Oklahoma had 17.4 motor vehicle deaths per 100,000 residents. For comparison, Mississippi had the nation’s highest car accident death rate at 25.2 deaths per 100,000 residents. Massachusetts had the lowest death rate at 5.7 deaths per 100,000 residents.

Oklahoma’s death rate was the eighth-worst in the country. In 2019, one out of every 5,747 Oklahoma residents died in a car crash.

The Oklahoma City metropolitan area spans four counties. These counties have widely divergent death rates. 

In 2019:

  • Oklahoma County had 9.29 motor vehicle deaths per 100,000 residents
  • Cleveland County had 10.49 motor vehicle deaths per 100,000 residents
  • Canadian County had 16.84 motor vehicle deaths per 100,000 residents
  • Pottawatomie County had 16.56 motor vehicle deaths per 100,000 residents

In Oklahoma County, one out of every 10,761 residents died in a car crash. But in Canadian County, one out of every 5,939 residents died in a car crash. This means your odds of dying in a car crash were almost 45% higher in Canadian County than in Oklahoma County.

Fatal Accidents by Age

One of the most significant factors in determining your risk of dying in a car crash is your age. All types of accidents, from car crashes to falls, present a significant cause of death in the U.S. But one age group has a significantly higher risk of dying in car crashes than other age groups.

Since 2000, the number of drivers older than 65 has increased by 60%. As you age, your risk of getting into an accident increases. Your eyesight and hearing may diminish. You may have physical problems, like arthritis, that limit your reflexes or strength.

You might also suffer from health problems that make it more difficult to survive an accident. Heart disease, diabetes, circulatory problems, and lung disease could turn a serious injury into a fatality.

As a result, the fatal accident rate among drivers over 65 now exceeds the crash rate for all other age groups. In 2019, the fatal accident rate among male drivers over 65 was 21.8 deaths per 100,000 drivers. This means that one out of every 4,587 male drivers over 65 died in a car crash in 2019.

Fatal Accidents by Driving Habits

Three additional factors have a significant effect on your odds of dying in a car crash:

Riding a Motorcycle

The odds of dying in a motorcycle accident are 29 times higher than dying in a car accident.

Seatbelt Use

Seatbelt use decreases your risk of dying in a car crash by 45%. In other words, not wearing a seatbelt nearly doubles your odds of dying in a car crash.

Where and How Much You Drive

The more you drive, the higher your odds of dying in a car crash. But where you drive also affects your risk. Fewer fatal accidents happen on divided interstate freeways than crowded city streets.

Reducing Your Odds of Dying in a Car Crash in Oklahoma City

You can influence your odds of dying in a car crash. Wearing a seatbelt, giving up your motorcycle, and cutting down on city driving can help you avoid fatal crashes. Also, practicing safe driving habits can diminish your odds.